Emily Linda Richard

Emily Linda Richard

Emily Linda Richard

Graduate Research Assistant

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience: Sex differences in Autism, MRI

Emily Richard is pursuing her PhD in Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience under the mentorship of Dr. Allison Jack. She completed her undergraduate studies at the George Washington University, where she graduated Cum Laude and with Special Honors in Psychology (concentration: Cognitive Neuroscience). Following her undergraduate work she took the position of Senior Research Assistant under Dr. Gregory Wallace in the Lab of Autism and Developmental Neuroscience. There she utilized structural MRI and behavioral measures to investigate both subclinical eating disorder traits and autism spectrum disorders, as well as eating behaviors in autism. She hopes to contribute to understanding of the female experience of autism and neural mechanisms thereof. In her free time, Emily loves teaching violin to young children and going on adventures with her fiancé and two Autralian Shepherds.

Selected Publications

Wallace, G.L., Richard, E., Peng, C. S., Knodt, A. R., & Hariri, A. R. (2019). Subclinical eating disorder traits are correlated with cortical thickness in regions associated with food reward and perception. Brain Imaging and Behavior, 1-7.

Recent Presentations

Richard, E., Nadeau, M. V., Wolff, A., & Wallace, G. L. (2019). Picky eaters exhibit heightened rigidity in Autistic but not in Typically-Developing children. International Conference on Children's Eating Behavior.

 

Richard, E., Nadeau, M. V., Wolff, A., & Wallace, G. L. (2019). Heightened emotional eating behaviors in children with Autism are modulated by gender. International Society for Autism Research.

 

Richard, E., Peng, C. S., Mehta, E., Yao, C., Knodt, A. R., Hariri, A. R., & Wallace, G. L. (2017). Gender modulates teh association between Autistic traits and cortical structure. National Academy for Neuropsychology.

 

Richard, E., Peng, C. S., Mehta, E., Yao, C., Knodt, A. R., Hariri, A. R., & Wallace, G. L. (2017). Cortical thickness correlates of subclinical Autistic traits in young adults. Society for Neuroscience.

 

Richard, E., Peng, C. S., Mehta, E., Yao, C., Knodt, A. R., Hariri, A. R., & Wallace, G. L. (2016). Subclinical eating disorder traits are correlated with cortical structure in regions associated with food perception and food reward. Cognitive Neuroscience Society.