In The Media

Dr. Thalia Goldstein interviewed for Health Benefits of the Arts Podcast Education Series

Dr. Thalia Goldstein interviewed for Health Benefits of the Arts Podcast Education Series

Dr. Thalia Goldstein from George Mason University’s Applied Developmental Psychology Department has had years of experience examining the health benefits of the arts for children and students. Among some of the findings: students with arts in their curriculum have higher academic grades, better test scores, less absenteeism (which leads to decreased hunger), better social skills and more expertise in collaborative work than those students without the arts.

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Anxious? Maybe You Can Exercise It Away

Anxious? Maybe You Can Exercise It Away

"There is considerable research indicating that exercise of almost any kind -- even a 10-minute walk -- can help people manage anxiety," said Maddux, who is also a senior scholar with GMU's Center for the Advancement of Well-Being

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Would More Free Time Really Make You Happier?

Would More Free Time Really Make You Happier?

That's because past research has found a harsh truth: People are bad at predicting what will make them happy, explained [James] Maddux, a senior scholar at George Mason University's Center for the Advancement of Well-Being, in Fairfax, Va.

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Pressure for Athletic Success Can Lead to Stress

Pressure for Athletic Success Can Lead to Stress

Specializing in one sport puts a child at risk for anxiety and depression suggests Jerome Short, PhD, professor of psychology at George Mason University. “Specialization leads to more of one's identity and self-worth coming from successful performance in a single sport,” he said. “Perceived threats and worries increase if we are not accomplishing our goals and having fun playing sports. We may feel helpless and hopeless about improving our performance.”

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Creating a Hybrid Future Outside of Work

Creating a Hybrid Future Outside of Work

It’s not just a matter of creating new habits, but changing the neurological architecture that’s shaped by our habits. “Brains change when you’re spending time online,” says Robyn Mehlenbeck from George Mason University. “We’re going to see some social skill deficits across the board as people are emerging from the pandemic.”

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Three ways that data may be deceiving you

Three ways that data may be deceiving you

However, the problem is that data sets are not infallible. Specifically, the presentation of data in the form of visualizations shouldn’t be considered as undeniable truth. Numbers can lie as well, and poorly done visualizations can easily mislead readers.

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Survey Finds Many Adults Don't Want Kids -- and They're Happy

Survey Finds Many Adults Don't Want Kids -- and They're Happy

That point was echoed by James Maddux, a senior scholar with the Center for the Advancement of Well-Being at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. Life satisfaction can come from understanding yourself and living according to those values, rather than trying to meet the expectations of society or family, he said.

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