Jordan M. Daylor

Jordan M. Daylor

Jordan M. Daylor

Graduate Research Assistant

Clinical Psychology: Forensic psychology, offender rehabilitation, program evaluation

Jordan is a fourth year student in the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program, working with Drs. June Tangney and Jeff Stuewig in the Human Emotions Research Lab. Broadly, she is interested in the evaluation and implementation of evidence-based practices in correctional facilities, as well as recidivism prediction. Jordan's current projects include: 1) developing strategic screening criteria to maximize the efficiency of jail-based treatment programs, 2) assessing the utility of various measures of criminal thinking and behavior, and 3) examining whether symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder are associated with higher rates of re-offending among former jail inmates at 1, 4 and 7 years post-release.

Selected Publications

Folk, J. B., Disabato, D. J., Daylor, J. M., Tangney, J. P, Sharen, B., Wilson, J., Holwager, J., & Bonieskie, L. (2016). Effectiveness of a self-administered intervention for criminal thinking: Taking a Chance on Change. Psychological Services, 13(3), 272 - 282.

Disabato, D. J., Folk, J. B., Wilson, J., Barboza, S., Daylor, J. M., & Tangney, J.P. (2016). Psychometric validation of a simplified form of the PICTS for low-reading level populations. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavior Assessment, 38(3), 456 - 464.

Education

University of California, San Diego     2012
B.S., Psychology                                    Magna Cum Laude

George Mason University                     2016
M.A., Clinical Psychology                                   

Recent Presentations

Daylor, J. M., Boren, E. A., Stuewig, J., & Tangney, J. P. (2017). Borderline symptoms and criminal behavior: Unidirectional or bidirectional effects? Paper presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C.

Tangney, J. P., Blalock, D. V., Daylor, J. M., Boren, E. A., & Stuewig, J. B. (2016). Beyond simply a history of bad behavior: Self-control is the best malleable psychological predictor of recidivism. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Santa Monica, CA.

Daylor, J. M., Blalock, D. V., Davis, T., Klauberg, W. X., Stuewig, J., & Tangney, J. P. (2016). Psychopaths tell the truth? Examining predictors of agreement between official records and self-reported arrests of former jail inmates. Poster presented at the 17th Annual Convention of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA.

Disabato, D. J., Folk, J. B., Wilson, J., Barboza, S., Daylor, J. M., & Tangney, J.P. (2015). Psychometric validation of a simplified form of the PICTS for assessing criminal thinking in low-reading level populations. Paper to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Washington, D.C.

Tangney, J. P., Daylor, J. M., Heigel, C., Warden, R., & Stuewig, J. (2015, June). Strategic jail intervention: The right treatment target with the right duration, based on stage of incarceration. Poster presented at the 3rd North American Correctional and Criminal Justice Psychology Conference, Ottawa, Canada.